All about vitamin E

All about vitamin E

Vitamin E was first discovered by Evans and Bishop in 1922. Vitamin E is not just a vitamin. In fact, vitamin E contains a variety of fat-soluble compounds. Alpha-tocopherol is the most common substance in the human body. Vitamin E is stored in the fat tissue of the body, so it is not necessary to take it every day. Why do we need vitamin E? Vitamin E is an essential nutrient for our vision, reproduction, brain, blood, skin and immune system. Vitamin E is also an effective antioxidant and helps fight free radicals in cells. Free radicals are molecules produced after exposure to environmental factors (such as smoking, pollution, ultraviolet light, and radiation). Antioxidant vitamins first discovered in the 1980s are related to cell breakdown. Free radicals are also related to the occurrence of cancer, heart disease and other diseases. Vitamin E can protect the body from free radical damage. However, vitamin E is strongly dependent on vitamin C, vitamin B3, selenium and glutathione. In other words, a diet rich in vitamin E will not achieve the best results if it is not taken with other nutrients. Fortunately, vitamin E deficiency is very rare. People who lack vitamin E often suffer from diseases related to abnormal fat metabolism, such as chronic diseases or cystic fibrosis. Lack of vitamin E can cause muscle and nerve damage, resulting in loss of consciousness, loss of movement and control, muscle weakness, vision problems and decreased immune system function. Benefits of taking vitamin E In addition to fighting free radicals and supporting the immune system, vitamin E has many other benefits. Help reduce the risk of age-related cataracts A study conducted in 2015 by the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, found that vitamin E intake and high serum tocopherol levels are associated with reducing the risk of senile cataracts . Helps to repair muscles A study conducted by the National Library of Medicine in 2015 showed that vitamin E can help muscle repair after exercise may help eliminate wrinkles and dark circles. "Journal of Aesthetic Dermatology" published in 2004 A study on topical gels containing vitamin E and other vitamins found that it can effectively reduce wrinkles and dark circles around the eyes. Relieving menstrual pain In 2004, the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology conducted a study on girls taking vitamin E supplements. Girls who took the supplement reported that they had less menstrual discomfort and blood loss. May help delay the development of Alzheimer's disease A study has shown that high-dose vitamin E may delay the development of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Make nails grow stronger. A review in the Indian Journal of Dermatology Online in 2016 pointed out that vitamin E can enhance nail function and promote nail growth. Sources of Vitamin E Vitamin E is found in many foods, but it has the highest content in seeds, nuts and vegetable oils. Here are some foods that contain the most vitamin E. Wheat Germ Oil Sunflower Seed Almond Avocado Hazelnut Abalone Peanut Vitamin E Harmful? Compared with water-soluble vitamins (such as vitamin C), fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamin E) have higher potential toxicity. Although the possibility of consuming toxic substances only from the diet is very small, excessive vitamin E is harmful. Too much vitamin E can cause nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, fatigue, weakness, headache, blurred vision, rash, bruises and bleeding. Although taking vitamin E in moderation is safe, taking large doses of vitamin E by mouth can also cause some problems. Because it is a very popular ingredient in many beauty products, it is usually safe for people to use topically on the skin.